JAYA DEVDUTT PATTANAIK PDF

The doorkeepers of Vaikuntha are the twins, Jaya and Vijaya, both to buy Jaya: Illustrated Retelling of Mahabharata by Devdutt Pattanaik. 1. Dr. Devdutt Pattanaik is a medical doctor by training, a marketing manager by profession and a mythologist by passion. He lectures extensively on the relevance. Jaya: An Illustrated Retelling of the Mahabharata eBook: Devdutt Pattanaik: : Kindle Store.

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Open Preview See a Problem? Thanks for telling us about the problem. Return to Book Page. Preview — Jaya by Devdutt Pattanaik. High above the sky stands Swarga, paradise, abode of the gods. Still above is Vaikuntha, heaven, abode of God.

The doorkeepers of Vaikuntha are the twins, Jaya and Vijaya, both whose names mean ‘victory’. One keeps you in Swarga; the other raises you into Vaikuntha. In Vaikuntha there is bliss forever, in Swarga there is pleasure for only as long as you deserve.

What is the High above the sky stands Swarga, paradise, abode of the gods.

Jaya: An Illustrated Retelling of the Mahabharata by Devdutt Pattanaik

What is the difference between Jaya and Vijaya? Solve this puzzle and you will solve the mystery of the Mahabharata. In this enthralling retelling of India’s greatest epic, the Mahabharata originally known as Jaya, Devdutt Pattanaik seamlessly weaves into a single narrative plots from the Sanskrit classic as well as its many folk and regional variants, including the Pandavani of Oattanaik, Gondhal of Maharashtra, Terukkuttu of Tamil Nadu and Yakshagana of Karnataka.

Richly illustrated with over line drawings by the author, the chapters abound with little-known details such as the names of the hundred Kauravas, the worship of Draupadi as a goddess in Tamil Nadu, the stories of Astika, Madhavi, Jaimini, Aravan and Barbareek, the Mahabharata version of the Shakuntalam and the Ramayana, and the dating of the war based on astronomical data.

With clarity and simplicity, the tales in this elegant volume reveal the eternal relevance of the Mahabharata, the complex and disturbing meditation on the human condition that has shaped Indian thought for over years. Paperbackpages. Published October 5th by Penguin Global first patatnaik August 14th The Great Indian Epics Retold.

To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up. To ask other readers questions about Jayaplease sign up. MaryNichols Mahabharatha will help to understand human psyche. It covers every aspect of human life. Is this book suitable for 11 year olds?

Dhiraj I think it would be more appropriate for an older person say one of the parents or grandparents to read and explain it to a 11 year old. That way the …more I think it would be more appropriate for an older person say one of the parents or grandparents to read and explain it to a 11 year old.

That way the child will be able to assimilate more and understand it better. Also, the story can be told in parts yo make it interesting. Else, an 11 year old reading it all by herself may find it heavy read, may lose interest or pattannaik not be able to understand the deeper, philosophical message contained in the book. See all 3 questions about Jaya…. Lists with This Book. Jan 27, Riku Sayuj rated it it was ok Shelves: I am stripping a star and retracting the positive aspects of this review well, at least in statement in light of later readings.

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Pattanaik’s myths are not to be read to ‘know’ the myths patanaik only for fun. Think of them as a modern variant of the Amar Chitra Katha s for the modern professional who has no time for unabridged epics! The book started well as it provided a fresh and clear take on Mahabharata without rationalizations and without apology.

Devdutt adopts a very trad EDIT: Devdutt adopts a very pattanakk stance and uses his small boxes to put in folk tales and other views on the topics.

Some of the illustrations are breathtaking in their honesty and imagination and is worth every penny spent on the books. But as the book progresses the reader gets the feeling that the incidents are treated a bit too cursorily.

Pattanaik has a wonderful way of looking at things, I only wish he had cared to look deeper with that vision. The amount of space dedicated to any given incident is too less and pattanaim makes the whole exercise a bit too shallow. There is not much new insight in the book if you are familiar with the epic. A few interesting folk tale traditions and the author’s take on what the driving philosophy is makes the book a worthwhile read but it all smacks a bit strongly of buddhism.

In the end, I was disappointed that so little was explored by an obviously very insightful author. I will be reading his other books soon with hope for more of the same clarity and less iaya the cursoriness. View all 11 comments. Feb 12, Dyuti rated it it was amazing Shelves: Devdutt Pattanaikmeet your latest devdytt fan: Indeed, I had tried several times before this to read the Mahabharat in its entirety, but could never finish it.

Not that I was not familiar with the stories: But I wanted more: I hungered to read them in a continuity — for chronology, for ease of understanding, and most importantly, for enjoyment. Until I found this book. Not only is the book wonderfully written, it is addictive! It is divided into parts 3 major parts: Each part has further subdivisions each of which further contain many stories.

Yet, it does not, not even for once, weigh you down with the many different characters, or their complex relationships with other. But what I enjoyed the most, were the little boxes at the end of every story which contained commentaries from the author analyzing devvutt specific event.

Sometimes they contain tid-bits of how those stories are relevant even today, or how they have seeped into our, and other foreign cultures.

Highly informative and fun to read. It is evident that a lot of research went into writing the book, and I always appreciate authors who work hard to gift you that extra something special. As an added bonus, the book had wonderful sketches by the author himself, which were a treat to admire. Nothing elaborate, but beautiful in their simplicity, glowing in the confidence of the bold strokes. View all 15 comments. When I give three stars to a book, it’s often grudgingly as I think I may be over-emphasising its merits, or guiltily as I think I may be downplaying the book’s merits.

These three stars are given guiltily. Pattnaik’s retelling of the Mahabharata is narrated in a simple manner, through the lens of present day wisdom but with an awareness of its absence in the past. One of the immediate impacts of listening to the audio is that I eagerly want to read the Bhagavad Gita.

Pattanaik’s take on the wisd When I give three stars to a book, it’s often grudgingly as I think I may be over-emphasising its merits, or guiltily as I think I may be downplaying the book’s merits. Pattanaik’s take on the wisdom Krishna imparted to Arjuna, was one I enjoyed.

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Perhaps, once I read the translation of the Mahabharatha, I will be able to judge this work on several scales. For now, it suffices to say that it is both enjoyable and non-trivial.

Review: Jaya by Devdutt Pattanaik

I also heard it instead of reading the illustrated version. I’ve flipped through the book before and think reading it will be better than listening to the audio. Jaya’s strength lies in the fact that it interprets the Mahabharata, something that is not done by most who have encountered the tales, and it does so in simple language. Additionally, it does not rely on the Sanskrit version alone but incorporates various folk tales from different regions. The Mahabharata is considered an Itihasa, meaning history.

Personally, I don’t see it that way. The value of the epic is in making one contemplate and Jaya’s primary motive may be to provide a boost to those who have not borne the fruits of active reading.

View all 5 comments. Dec 16, Anubhav dsvdutt it it was amazing Shelves: I don’t always judge a book by its cover but in this case, the cover just lured me pattanak.

I hardly ever write a review I’m too jxya rating the book is as far as I go because all it takes is a click but in this case I felt like making an exception. So the author chooses to call his book ‘Jaya – Ppattanaik illustrated retelling of the Mahabharata’ rather than simply ‘Mahabharata retold’ or some such It is not just to stand apart from the other versions, no maam; he just I don’t always judge a book by its cover but in this case, the patranaik just lured me in.

It is not just to stand apart from the other versions, no maam; he justifies his choice of this title quite satisfactorily before the book ends. Also, this book is literally ‘illustrated’ with his line drawings which are simple yet evocative.

This book is pattanaok into 18 parts. Ved Vyasa’s Mahabharata is also divided into 18 parvas but there is no one-to-one correspondence between the divisions made by Vyasa and Pattanaik. For example, in this book the great war has been compressed into just 1 part whereas in Vyasa’s version, 4 of the 18 parvas are devoted to the war – Bhishma parva, Drona parva, Karna parva and Shalya parva. That is because this book focuses on something much beyond the war.

It tries to find the message for mankind hidden in the complexities of this epic saga. Each of the chapters ends with some bullet points which present alternate versions of the stories contained in that chapter, its significance in context of the overall story etc.

This was, pathanaik me, the best part of this book and what may possibly make it worth a read even for those who are already quite familiar with the tale as I was even before reading this book. It is very easy to miss the forest for the trees when you embark upon this adventure called Mahabharata, so Pattanaik spells it out for you, and I believe there is no harm in benefiting from his vast research.